Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Short-Term Care for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

While the primary driver for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may sometimes be hormonal changes (hypothyroid, pregnancy, or birth control use), type 2 diabetes, or an inflammatory condition (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or gout), many patients’ hand and wrist symptoms are caused by musculoskeletal issues that place pressure on the median nerve or restrict its motion. The good news is that chiropractic care is a great fit for the CTS patient,...

Nerve Mobility and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

According to the American Medical Association Guides on the Rating of Permanent Impairment, if one loses the use of their thumb, index finger, and middle finger, they’ve lost 80% of the use of their hand. It’s no wonder why carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS)—a condition characterized by symptoms of numbness, tingling, pain, and weakness that affects these digits (in addition to half of the ring finger)—can be such a debilitating condition! Peripheral...

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Causes and Treatments

Who Gets Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Though carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) affects 4% of the population, some individuals have a much greater risk for the condition, and several factors may need to be addressed to achieve a successful outcome. Trauma: An acute trauma, such as a bone fracture, can lead to CTS. However, repetitive stress injuries are more commonly associated with the condition. Anatomy: Not all wrists are equal, and some individuals, especially biological women, may have a...

When to Seek Surgical Care for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a condition that occurs when the median nerve is compressed as it passes through the wrist. One treatment option available to patients is carpal tunnel release surgery, which severs the carpal tunnel ligament to reduce pressure on the affected nerve to resolve the numbness, pain, tingling, and weakness symptoms associated with CTS. When is surgical treatment for CTS necessary and when should a non-surgical option...

Repetitive Movement and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Of all the potential contributing factors for carpal tunnel syndrome—diabetes, thyroid dysfunction, inflammatory arthritis, pregnancy, birth control usage, and obesity—perhaps the most well-known is participating in jobs and activities that require fast, repetitive hand movements that can place increased pressure on the median nerve as it passes through the wrist. What can someone do if they begin experiencing tingling and numbness or pain and weakness associated with carpal tunnel syndrome...